Professional Certificate of Competency in Electrical Power System Protection (CPS) - 3 month, live online course


Company Information



Company/Provider: IDC Technologies

Email: Send Enquiry / Make A Booking

Telephone: 011 024 5520



Address:
Waterfall Park, Bekker Road
Elevation Gardens, Elevations Close, Block 2, Ground floor Vorna Valley
Midrand
Gauteng
South Africa

Price:
Request A Price

Course Description

BY THE END OF THIS 3-MONTH INTERACTIVE LIVE ONLINE COURSE YOU WILL BE ABLE TO:

* Understand the fundamentals of electrical power protection and applications
* Recognize the different fault types
* Perform simple fault and design calculations
* Understand protection system components
* Perform simple relay settings
* Choose appropriate protective devices for different equipment
* Interpret the protection systems existing in your plant, understand their functions, detect any shortcoming and explain any undesired or uncoordinated relay operation
* Make more informed decisions on electrical power system protection
* Significantly improve the safety of your site

Date(s)

22 August 2016

Duration

3 months

Notes

OVERVIEW

Any power system is prone to 'faults' (also called short-circuits), which occur mostly as a result of insulation failure and sometimes due to external causes. When a fault occurs, the normal functioning of the system gets disturbed. The high current resulting from a fault can stress the electrical conductors and connected equipment thermally and electro-dynamically. Arcs at the fault point can cause dangerous or even fatal burn injuries to operating and maintenance workers in the vicinity. Faults involving one phase and ground give rise to high 'touch' and 'step' voltages posing danger of electrocution to personnel working nearby. It is therefore necessary to detect and clear any fault quickly. The first device used in early electrical systems was the fuse, which acted both as the sensor and the interrupting device. With larger systems, separate devices became necessary to sense and interrupt fault currents. In the beginning these functions were combined in a single assembly; a circuit breaker with in-built releases.

This practice is still prevalent in low voltage systems. In both high systems and low voltage systems of higher capacities, the sensing is done by more sophisticated devices called relays. Relays were initially electro-mechanical devices but static relays and more recently digital relays have become the norm. With more complex systems, it is necessary to detect the point of fault precisely and trip only those sections affected by the fault while the rest of the system can continue to function normally. In the event of the nearest circuit breaker failing to operate, the next breaker in the upstream (feeding) side has to be tripped as a 'back up' measure. Another requirement is to minimise the time for which a fault remains in the circuit; this is necessary to reduce equipment damage and the danger to operating personnel.

These requirements necessitate different forms of relaying apart from the simple current sensing relays. Equipment such as generators, transformers and motors also need special forms of protection characterised by their design and operating principles.

This course will explain all of these points in detail and provide you with the skills and knowledge necessary to calculate fault currents, select relays and associated instrument transformers appropriate to each typical system or equipment. You will also learn how to adjust the setting of the relays so that the relays closest to the fault will operate and clear the fault faster than the backup devices.

Location

World Wide (E-learning)

Venue

E-learning


Profile Manager








Designed Developed Hosted Clearmark